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The Polish Education Option (and More Culture!)

Back to Poland, we go, for a more in-depth look at some ideas and suggestions I thinly addressed a few weeks ago. This is part four in the series.

PART I: Poland

PART II: Slovakia

PART III: Hungary

What I’ve found is amazing and inspiring. First, a word of caution! Always read the fine print (in a language you understand) before leaping to conclusions. I found something called the NAWA “First Choice” Program and initially assumed it applied to all levels of college study in Poland when, in fact, it is graduate-based. I’ll get to that shortly – it’s incredible. And, it’s far from the only option. All you have to do is dig around for what you need or want; today, I’m trying to help move those first few shovel-loads. 

And, I have some more good news about the good country in general. A few years ago, under pressure from the usual satanists, the Poles (very slightly) relaxed their ban on infanticide. They realized their mistake and, in a story I saw a month ago, made a move to correct it – and then some. The new law will do three things: (re) ban abortions; terminate pedo-friendly sex ed in primary schools, and; call out the “P” in LGBTP for what it is. This is the beauty of a homogeneous Christian nation. Contrast this to dead Amerika with its million child murders per year, school “hero” lessons about child rapists, and proceeding legalization of child molestation (CA, naturally – look it up). 

The best news is that the Poles, being decent, Godly people, do not necessarily need this legislation for themselves. Rather, it is meant to preemptively exclude and criminalize the kinds of trash that intruded upon and then destroyed the American nation. 

Poland’s President, Andrzej Duda, recently vowed to defend Poland and the nation’s children and families from the kind of “social experiments” that are found in every grade in your child’s fake Amerikan public school and every Amerikan media second and that have utterly wrecked your nation. He’s 100% serious and backed by a similar percentage of Poles. 

“Poland has largely resisted policies of multiculturalism and identity politics followed by other western nations and has blocked EU demands that it take in migrants from Muslim countries. Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawieck previously echoed Duda’s sentiment, encouraging people to have more children while asserting, ‘There is no strong Poland without strong families.’”

Yes! Imagine if your idiot Republicans had done this – done this, not said this – back around 1965. Poland will remain Poland whether the hell the globos like it or not.

Life In Krakow

Poland is full of areas of habitation, from the smallest village to the metropolis of Warsaw. There’s something for everybody of compatible nature and goodwill. None of these towns feature “no-go” zones, as found in places like Paris and every sizable Amerikan city – unless you are a criminal or a communist, in which case the whole nation is a “no-go.” 

I think I have found my little mountain town if I were included in this expedition. (Rumors of my seeking emergency political asylum are just plain…). This town will, for now, remain unnamed. All that matters today is that it is roughly an hour and a half away from bustling Krakow. Poland’s second-largest city, formerly home to Pope John Paul II (then Karol Józef Wojtyła), is the one I chose as an example of what awaits our civilization seekers.

Krakow is a city of 800,000 in a metro area of about 2 million. Again, this is me, the recluse, praising a medium-sized city. I can do so because, based on what I’ve found, it’s simply incredible. It’s also extremely low-cost for the type of urban environment it is and for the luxuries it offers. Note: when you’re scouting around for prices, remember several things. Prices are sometimes quoted, at international sites, in dollars. Otherwise, they’re sometimes in euros, and most frequently, in złotys. The rough rule of thumb is that a złoty equals a quarter-dollar or a quarter-euro. Divide by four and see the savings!

Another cool thing I’ve noticed – and I’ve only looked at a few options – is that salaries in Krakow/Poland appear to be quoted AFTER taxes. The upfront cost of Polish taxation might seem steep by Amerikan standards, but it is all upfront, without hidden fees, alternative taxes, regulatory compliance cost factors, competition from cheap, illegal labor, and hideous world-reserve monetary inflation. My estimate is that, overall, the rates are roughly the same. The difference is that the Polish assessment is more honest and the net pay goes further. Hey… Could you please GET OFF ORBITZ for a damned second…

Here follows just a little of what I’ve discovered recently. A really nice apartment in the city center, which is a little island of quaintness, encircled by a moat-like park, in a sea of greater quaintness, may be rented for less than a thousand dollars. Something comparable further out averages around $650. Many of these feature pools, gyms, secured parking, concierge service, and are sometimes furnished. Student apartments – you probably get what you pay for – start around $150 a month. A nice little condo or house, from the near-center out to the pastoral suburbs, can be found for around, just over, or even under $100,000. 

Getting around appears to be a pleasant endeavor. Much of the city is walkable or bikeable. A month’s unlimited transit ticket is about $26. If you want a car, they have them all. A Corolla is the same there as here and is priced the same. Jeeps are popular. They have a million-dollar AMG monster lurking in the Mercedes showroom. I did not consult used prices or check to see if they offer ultra-cheap, ultra-small “teenager” city cars as do the French. You can check on that along with motorcycles and scooters – my guess is that they do. By the way, the French offer a class of tiny, inexpensive cars for younger teenagers – age 14 or 15 I think – that is sufficient for getting around, slowly, cheaply, and without the rigors of full licensure. But hey, Amerika, you gots freedom fries, right? The structure of Polish education (see below) is much like the French system – which is several heads and shoulders about that in dead Amerika, even at the public, government level.  

I found several cost of living charts and calculators though I choose not to include them. Their prices looked good, in line with what I found on the internet, but their salaries were skewed on the low side. Note: the only salaries I looked at were for teachers (more below). A primary school teacher appears to earn approximately $2,000 per month after taxes. This is sufficient for a very nice living in the city. Contract English teachers (more below) earn less, around $1,300 per month. However, those jobs also offer free accommodations, which renders the net effect of another very nice living.

And, if you like living, I think you’ll like Krakow. Not all corners host a church, museum, or castle, but many do. Parks are ubiquitous. They have an indoor water park and an outdoor version with associated amusements. Both are priced well below DevilMouseLand rates. Malls? They have several, each large, modern, and free of riffraff. “Dumpling” joints are popular, as are most other eateries. These people like bars. 

There’s a street near the central plaza with a well-stocked American bookstore – all English titles – which looks nicer than any such store I’ve seen in Amerika in decades. Right next door is one of the nicest cigar shops I have ever seen. Two “brands” – Davidoffs and Cubanos! (I understand the Nicaraguan heavies are making tasty inroads lately. Cigar prices seem to be approximately those of low-tax US States like FLA). Under the cigar lounge hides a five-star French restaurant, home to two-star prices. Across the street is one of those bars. GET OFF ORBITZ!!!

When you’re done with this article, please stay the urge to look at flights and Duck or Start Page around for a while. You’ll like what you see.

There is also an abundant and varied nightlife. It’s a big city. If you’re tempted to go the banal PUA route, then there are copious sites about the “hunting” prospects. For the serious among you, hopefully, all of you, check out what Roosh V. had to say about “game” in Poland when he was unsaved versus what he says now as a Christian. 

Teach English (not necessarily in a Polish school either)

I mentioned teaching English as an employed way into Polish life. It’s a very viable option. English is the second language of the country. A third of the population speaks it, with a substantially higher number of young Poles doing so. They need instruction. With moderate training and certification, many of you should qualify for this kind of work. Visit THIS SITE or one like it to get started.

Also, please browse through Australian Phil Forbes recounting of his collected experiences teaching English in Poland. I must advise that I was slightly taken aback by one of his blog entries wherein he questioned some of the inherent values of Polish culture and norms. (Don’t be that kind of visitor!) But, on the whole, I think his insights may help. He even explained, in fairly strong detail, his path to obtaining a Karta Pobytu (“Green Card”) in Poland. It’s not a simple process, though it appears manageable. This should serve as excellent starting advice for anyone considering a move under any circumstances – teaching, learning, working, retiring, etc.

Perhaps his best advice, and that which is applicable across any border(s) is to hire a knowledgeable immigration attorney. In Poland, Forbes recommends Mr. Piotr Sawicki, Esq. of Warsaw. Sawicki speaks fluent English as he previously did time at the University of Florida School of Law. Call him and his staff for more details. Whatever the price, it will be zlotys, euros, or dollars well spent.

Or, Be Taught (at a Polish College)

Please introduce yourselves, young Americans, to Jagiellonian University in Krakow – that’s “Jah-jay-elon-ion” U, I think… This large (43,000+ students) establishment has been in business since 1364(!) and, today, offers programs, graduate and undergraduate, and doctoral, in dozens of fields and specialties. It differs starkly from almost all colleges in the fading empire. It’s affordable: zero tuition for Poles; Amerikan public college “in-state” level tuition for internationals. It’s full of serious students who are capable of learning at an advanced level and proceed to do as such. It is free of political correctness, communism, and associated foolishness. The esteemed Fred Reed did a great job, in way of contrast, by briefly recapping the utter failings of US “schools” in his recent discourse on the decline and fall. 

You don’t have to suffer the embarrassment of attending a dead Amerikan “school.” JU is a grand alternative. It is one (of the very best) of hundreds of colleges, universities, and technical schools in Poland.

You might benefit, now, from the “Around Poland in Polish” on-line course, a survey of both the home language and the marvelous culture. Check that last link, and then dive in HERE

JU’s programs are too multitudinous to list, however, here is a quick breakdown of some of their graduate humanities offerings:

  • Business and Finance
  • Comparative Heritage
  • European Studies
  • Intellectual Property and Technology
  • International Relations
  • International Security and Development

I thought there was something familiar about all of this. It turns out that the International Relations department works in consortium with the faculty of Matej Bel University, Banska Bystrica, Slovakia. Dr. Ironsides did, in fact, make mention of some joint something or other.

I’ll start with the graduate (second-cycle to the Poles) studies first, as that was where my near SNAFU originated, as mentioned above. It turns out that Poland is looking for intelligent and compatible international students in the nation’s graduate schools. If you’re a US college senior or recent graduate (my condolences), then please check out the almost unbelievable scholarships available via the NAWA, Poland, My First Choice Program(me)

Upfront note: the materials that I have found are all at least one year out of date. I suspect the lack of an update has to do with the Great Hoax of 2020. There’s nothing we can do about that, but keep your hopes up that they will relax and reopen soon. Be ready when and if they do.

What They Say:

“The Poland My First Choice scholarship programme aims to encourage young talented people from the countries listed below to pursue studies at the best Polish HEIs.

The Programme offers an opportunity to pursue full-time second-cycle studies at public and private HEIs on all fields of study offered by institutions offering education at highest level – i.e. those classified to the A and A+ category under the latest parametric evaluation – subordinate to the Minister of Science and Higher Education, with a monthly NAWA scholarship amounting to PLN 2,000 (ca. EUR 460) to cover the living allowance during the period of education in Poland specified in the Regulations. In the case of public HEIs, the Programme also offers an exemption from education fees. The Programme provides the participants with an opportunity to study in Polish or in another language. The Applicants select HEIs and fields of study in which they want to enrol based on the educational offer of Polish higher education institutions and apply for the curriculum of their choice. Final decisions regarding admissions of Applicants and financial conditions of education shall be made by HEIs.

The scholarship offer is addressed to foreigners – the citizens of the following countries: [Follows a list of countries that, upon critical examination, TPC might choose to censor or whitewash for some unknown reason].”

The US is on the list. The programme – British English spelling, there – covers all public schools and many or most privates (to some degree). It is also apparently good for almost all fields of inquiry. 

THE RULES

It’s 48-pages of fine print. But, if you’re worried, you do not have to know Polish at this point – though you should rapidly learn it before or after your arrival. The qualification is Polish -or- English proficiency. I assume that having made it this far into the article, you at least read English. You’re halfway there, kids!

A SAMPLE AGREEMENT

Read that – it’s a binding contract – and the rules carefully. You have some serious responsibilities as you receive some serious benefits. In addition to covering the entire tuition at places like JU, they will also give you a living stipend, the amount of which is determined by and between you and them. In other words, this is potentially a completely-paid route into a living civilization. Take advantage and be scrupulous.

Okay, I tuckered out after running through the foregoing. However, I did not neglect the undergraduates among you. If you’re a US high school senior or recent HS grad (my condolences), then look HERE, HERE, HERE, HERE, and HERE. YOU’RE WELCOME.

With my (free) prompting and your hard work, the sky really is the limit. Get going today!

Getting There: Alternative Transportation

With this whole series, I sincerely hope there is still time to act. (I’m positive there is). But, right now, with the sky falling, etc., things may get a little harder. If you’re serious about going to Europe, for any reason, then you might want to fly out sooner than later. Rumors swirl that the EU may lock Amerikans out because of the Detrick-Harvard Virus, Hoaxid-19. (See endnote…) In the future, as domestic matters further deteriorate, the lockout may become permanent. Don’t wait until you’re a refugee fleeing war and oppression. Euros, in general, are sick of that kind of visitor as-is, and, as previously noted, Easterns don’t take them anyway. You don’t want them seeing you as someone who screwed up his own country and is only running to theirs to do the same thing. Of course, when the heavy bombings start and they’re shooting down airliners, easy departure will be out of the question. I’d like to say you have through the rest of the decade, but I’m prone to realism. Sooner than later.

Okay, NOW it’s Orbitz time. I checked on some flights, with Atlanta (ATL) as the starting point, and Krakow (KRK) as the destination. One-way trips, with a stop at de Gaulle, run around $1,000 for a “very good” flight. If you want to return, then a round trip is a few hundred dollars more. You’ll obviously need, in addition to long-term paperwork, a Passport. I also recommend getting an IDP, based on the nebulous north and south zoning for eastern Schengen car insurance scams, er, rates.

Ever since the Patriots!!! decided to take our freedoms away in order to preserve them, I have detested commercial aviation with a heated passion, flying only once (for necessary business) in the last ten or so years. I also checked on the GA routes, and … one-way, just to Paris, on your own rental sets you back about $80K. So…

Take a CARGO SHIP!

Seriously. Freight moves across the Atlantic every single day and night and those giant ships have a few extra cabins they rent to travelers. Check THIS out. At that site, I think I saw a container cruise from Charleston to Antwerp. It takes about nine days to make the voyage, with the eighth day held over in Liverpool. The going rates vary, but are usually between $75 and $120 per day, approximately the price of the one-way flight. Plus, you get a cruise vacation on the way.

The ships are huge, stable, and well-appointed. The cabins look larger and nicer than what one might find on one of the ghastly petri dish / floating buffets of the Carnival variety. Plus, it will only be you, maybe two to six other passengers, and fifteen to twenty crewmen. They have gyms, bars, great food, plenty of deck space, endless fresh air and sunshine, satellite communication, and some ships even have pools. You’ll find plenty of videos about the experience. Best of all, perhaps, is the customs angle. It appears that about nine out of ten times, that process consists of the Captain or someone at the terminal stamping you and saying, “have a nice day.” This could conceivably be a way around a Hoaxid quarantine or even an embargo. You have options.

You also have options going from port to Poland – bus, train, rental car, or plane. Flights between European cities can be ridiculously cheap (like $25). Subcompact rentals are equally inexpensive, even with “their” insurance (get it), though they will hit you for dropping off in another country. I’d go with the train, were I in your young shoes. Oh, speaking of, you can also hike or bike. Options.

However you get there, enjoy the trip and remember that you’re doing your small part to save the West. My postcard isn’t obligatory and I’d probably soon misplace it, but it’s the thought, you know.

**Drafting-time Update: As of Wednesday, July 1, 2020, Americans are banned from entering the EU for the duration of the Hoaxid, Phase X, but hopefully not for the full duration of the national demise.

*Again, if re-posting this article, please do it: in full, by simple link (with or without quote(s), or not at all.