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A new look at an old horror:

When Government Schools Kill

 

Nobody is killing me, my friends, by treachery, not using any force.” – Polyphemus, The Odyssey

 

I’m sure it’s happened, but I am unaware of any direct homicide of any student at the hands of a public school. The indirect killings, however, are legion. There are murders of other kinds too, and numerous beyond count. The schools kill creativity. They kill interest. They kill intellect. They kill souls or parts thereof. They kill critical thinking. They exterminate freedom. Honestly, it’s why they exist.
 

Most United States residents and most Americans still find this acceptable. It’s only when one or more children get gunned down at a school that any semblance of outrage arises. And then, it’s usually, by design, twisted around into further hatred of liberty. A maddening cycle.
 

Such was the case at Stoneman Douglas High School, in Broward County, Florida, on February 14, 2018. The school system, Broward County, the State of Florida, and the Imperial US government, with the great assistance of gunman Nikolas Cruz, murdered fourteen students and three adults. The system, as much as Cruz, did this with great malice and tremendous planning aforethought. 
 

One of the deceased victims was Meadow Pollack, an eighteen-year-old student. Her father, Andrew Pollack, along with Max Eden, published a new book, which sheds much-needed light on the matter. 
 

Why Meadow Died: The People and Policies That Created The Parkland Shooter and Endanger America’s Students
 

Please read a few excerpts from a recent New York Post article. The system knew, for years, that Cruz was a dangerous, crazed sociopath. “Why did the school allow him to remain enrolled despite his daily, deranged behavior for a full year? Not by negligence, but by policy.” Multiple policies dictate that students like Cruz must be tolerated, even at the expense of the safety of everyone else in the schools. 
 

Pursuant to these policies, records are kept. Pollack published notes from Carrie Yon, Cruz’s Eight Grade English teacher. I’ll relay two which, independent of everything else, scream out an alarm:
 

Sept. 11: After discussing and lecturing about the Civil War in America Nick became fixated on the death and the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. He asked inappropriate questions and was making shooting actions with his pencil. Some questions he asked were “What did it sound like when Lincoln was shot? Did it go pop pop or pop pop pop really fast? Was there blood everywhere? After the war what did they do with all the bodies? Did people eat them?

Sept. 16: When we began to read the Odyssey Nick paid partial attention (in-and-out) until we came up to the gruesome scene when the giant eats Odysseus’ crew members, only then Nick was interested in the lesson and got my 100% attention.

ORIGINALLY FROM TPC!