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Many, many years ago, I applied to 2.5 colleges out of my shortlist of 4. I could have those numbers reversed, not sure ALL THESE YEARS later. I was accepted into all 5, though none of the 3 were Penn., home to the Wharton School of Globalism Business. However, Wharton (specifically) had been at least a plausible educational thought – a back-burner institute. Why? Because of the respect I had (still have, grudgingly…) for one of its alumni. Any respect for the school itself is gone now.

I am increasingly worried that 2019 feels ever more like 1929. Back then, inequality was at an all-time high. Authoritarian nationalism was on the rise. World War I had exploded the old global order without creating a new one. Then the stock market crash of October 1929 ignited the horrendous cascade of depression, fascism and World War II —arguably the worst 15 years in history.

Many of the future’s best jobs will require “soft skills” like teamwork and empathy, about the furthest frontier for robots.

Finally, when it comes to politics, “leadership” is the inevitable bromide to reverse the nativist, anti-immigration and anti-globalization sentiment so prominent today. But providing this leadership means more than political rhetoric. What we need is politicians who speak plainly about deep realities and difficult solutions.

We need leaders who defend technology and globalization by both explaining how they work and how societies have benefited from them. Consumers would lose big time from reversing these megatrends — and not just because of tariffs. Having everything from clothing and steel to smartphones and computer chips “made in America” sounds good — until you realize just how much more consumers would have to pay for them.

Leaders should not only show real empathy for the people who have been dislocated by technology and globalization but also present compelling plans for extending the benefits to them. Education is the answer. Issues of access and affordability are no doubt important. But we must also focus on changing education to match the jobs of tomorrow.

Are we fated to re-live the horrors of the 1930s? Certainly not. But we must acknowledge the profound challenges in front of us. “Downton Abbey” is wonderful to watch. But its underlying point is that the naïve optimism of the 1920s was breathtakingly dangerous.

That pack of BS and lies is from a Wharton deen. (DO NOT send your kids there!) Go watch the glorious faded past movie, bub. The man (I guess?) is 1,459 years out of his reckoning. It’s not 1929. It’s more like 470. I wonder if some Roman hand-wringer went about the collapsing Empire soothing the peeps with empathy, immigration, globalization, and education? Probably.

They probably had “conservative” losers (pardon the redundancy redundancy) like this guy.

What’s needed is not mere “outreach” to black, Hispanic, or Jewish voters. Conservatives ought to make elevation of African Americans, immigrants, and religious minorities so central to conservatism that all dedicated racists will be thoroughly repelled. If we can’t make them stop calling themselves the “alt-right,” because they won’t want to be associated with us, we can at least disgust them with such a focus.

Why? Mostly because it’s the right thing to do.

Conservatives don’t [blah, blah, blah]

To accept this reality doesn’t require one to declare that whites are all vile racists or oppressors. It doesn’t require agreeing that the U.S. is fundamentally a white supremacist nation. It just requires the sincere acceptance of two premises: First, that all humans are created equal (the official teaching of the U.S. founders and all Abrahamic religions), and second, that blacks and Hispanics have far worse outcomes in the U.S.

Next year, this fool will declare that whites are all vile racists. “I’m a moron, a cuck, and a liar, just not a racist!” I doubt any real Romans left at the end of the 5th century gave two shits about what bad names their enemies called them.

The good news is that, as I drift further from the foolish mainstream and the decayed culture, I recognize fewer and fewer of these idiots’ names.